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USSOCOM chooses Horus Reticle for Ranging – Variable Power Scope (R-VPS) Program

Horus Vision is proud to announce that the Horus TREMOR3™ Reticle has been selected to fill the Ranging – Variable Power Scope (R-VPS) component of the Miniature Aiming Systems – Day Optic (MAS-D) Program for the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM).

 

Installed into the Nightforce MIL-SPEC ATACR™ 4-20×50 F1, the TREMOR3 will be integrated as the Mid-Range and the Designated Marksman solutions for USSOCOM’s current and future anticipated Semi-Automatic Sniper Systems. 

The R-VPS will round out a complete family of Variable Power Scopes containing Horus Reticles, all awarded to Nightforce Optics, within the MAS-D Program. As part of a life cycle replacement program and capabilities enhancement, the Nightforce MIL-SPEC ATACR™ 4-20 with Horus TREMOR3 reticle, is optimized to provide improved target detection and identification, as well as hit probability, for engagements out to 1,200m.

 

“Through innovation, Horus Vision has continued to be the chosen reticle of America’s most elite soldiers. The continued use of Horus reticles will serve USSOCOM personnel with consistency across other platforms that already feature Horus reticles. We will continue to develop technologies to increase the capabilities of both long and short range optics and look forward to continuing to support USSOCOM.” said Horus Vision’s Program Director, Nate Gallery. 

 

The Nightforce MIL-SPEC ATACR™ 4-20 offers excellent performance in intermediate range target detection as well as reliable mechanical adjustment. The optic feature Nightforce’s exceptional glass, 0.1 Mil-Radian adjustment value for both windage and elevation, and a tan, hardcoat anodized finish. Like the previous VPS Program solutions the R-VPS is provided as a system, utilizing a purpose-built Nightforce scope mount and laser range finder integration platform. When employed as a complete solution, the SOF end-user’s ability to detect, range, and receive a firing solution correlates well with the semi-automatic weapon capability it is intended to enhance. The new optics are to augment multiple systems in the SOCOM inventory and are intended to support the MRGG (Mid-Range Gas Gun) once it is fielded.  This scope joins the ATACR™ Nightforce 1-8×24, ATACR™ Nightforce 5-25×56, and the ATACR™ Nightforce 7-35×56 all of which feature Horus Reticles for USSOCOM. 

 

For more information on Horus Vision visit www.horusvision.com

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The Canadian choice of reticle is the TREMOR3

The Department of National Defence in Canada have decided to equip their new C20 semi-automatic precision rifles, made by Colt Canada, with 3-20×50 PMII Ultra Short riflescopes from the German manufacturer. The “Ultrashorts” are great riflescope for any type of AR-based rifle, where space on top of the Picatinny is tight, but you still want to be able to use the C20’s ballistics and range to its full extent with the help of the optic. The Canadian choice of reticle is the TREMOR3 (FFP). What is unique for Canada is that the coating is a special order: COYOTE M17 TAN color.

 

To learn more visit The Firearms Blog

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U.S. Marine Corps Chooses the Horus TREMOR3 Reticle

The U.S. Marine Corps has selected the Nightforce Optics Mil-Spec ATACR 5-25×56 mm F1 riflescope for use as the day optic on the Mk13 Mod 7 .300 Win. Mag. sniper weapons system. The new rifle and scope combination is completely new from the M40 rifle, which has been in service since the Vietnam War.

“The optic features a Horus TReMoR3 Reticle and provides operators with an integrated milliradian-based grid that incorporates time-of-flight wind dots,” said Nightforce’s Mil-Gov-LE Business Development Manager Tod Litt. “Those dots are calibrated to the rifle and ammunition and aid in making quick, formula-free wind calls by judging direction and wind speed in miles per hour. The advanced reticle incorporates the Accuracy 1st speed shooting formula that makes engagement of moving targets easier and reduces engagement times for a substantial improvement in first-round hits.”

Adjustments on the optic are made using the patented NightForce Hi-Speed ZeroStop and the parallax dial is coupled to DigIllum digital-reticle illumination. The windage knob is cap covered to minimize inadvertent movement. The first-focal-plane, 34 mm riflescope weighs 38 ounces and has an overall length of 15.37 inches.    

“The increased capability of the newly issued Mk13 Mod 7 sniper rifle requires a scope that is as rugged, reliable, repeatable and dependable as the United States Marines tasked with using it,” said Litt. “The Nightforce MIL-SPEC ATACR 5-25×56 F1 was chosen as the day scope to take full advantage of the rifle systems’ competencies.”The new rifle is scheduled to be fielded late this year and early 2019 by elite Marine Corps Scout Snipers, although it’s already serving with MARSOC’s precision shooters. “The new day optic allows for positive identification of enemies at greater distances, and it has a grid-style reticle that allows for rapid reengagement without having to dial adjustments or ‘hold’ without a reference point,” Sgt. Randy Robles, Quantico Scout Sniper School instructor explained in May. “With this type of weapon in the fleet, we will increase our lethality and be able to conceal our location because we are creating a buffer between us and the enemy.”

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U.S. Marine Corps Chooses TREMOR3 for Mk13 Mod 7 Sniper System

The U.S. Marine Corps has selected the Nightforce Optics Mil-Spec ATACR 5-25×56 mm F1 riflescope for use as the day optic on the Mk13 Mod 7 .300 Win. Mag. sniper weapons system. The new rifle and scope combination is completely new from the M40 rifle, which has been in service since the Vietnam War. Read more at shootingillustrated.com

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U.S. Marines Are Finally Getting a New Sniper Rifle

The U.S. Marine Corps is replacing its existing sniper rifles with a newer model that fires a heavier, longer-range bullet. The new Mark 13 Mod 7 sniper rifle, a favorite of Navy SEALs is replacing the older M40 series of rifles. The result is a more accurate rifle with the potential to hit targets at nearly three quarters of a mile.

The M40 series of sniper rifles has served the Marine Corps for more than 50 years. Originally introduced during the Vietnam War, the Marine Corps purchased commercial Remington Model 40X bolt-action varmint rifles with heavy barrels, slapped on a Redfield 3-9x variable power scope, and gave them the designation M40. The M40 served in the Vietnam War and every conflict since then, progressively upgraded with new features such as a new Remington 700 action, fiberglass stocks, new optics, and other shooting accessories.

Despite the upgrades, the M40 series was limited by the ballistics of the .308 Winchester round. Although an effective hunting and military round, a.308 round rapidly loses energy after 700 yards. At 600 yards, a sniper armed with a M40 can expect a bullet to drop 105 inches short of the target, requiring upward compensation of 105 inches to remain on target. At 800 yards the drop balloons to 228 inches, and at 1,000 yards the drop is 421 inches. This loss of energy also affects wind drift, with .308 requiring 53 inches of wind correction in a five mile-per-hour wind to hit a target at 1,000 yards. The M40 series’ maximum effective range is about 1,000 yards.

The fewer corrections a sniper must make to hit a long distance target the better, and sharpshooters accomplish this by using a heavier, higher-power round. Unlike the older .308 round, the bigger .300 Winchester Magnum is effective out to 1,300 yards. It requires only 246 inches of vertical correction at 1,000 yards, and 40 inches of horizontal correction at 1,000 yards in a five mile-per-hour wind. The heavier round also hits with more energy at longer ranges, making it more likely to incapacitate the target. The .300 round’s maximum range is about 1,300 yards.

Now, according to Military Times, the Marines are finally switching to a .300 Winchester Magnum platform. The Mark 13 Mod 7 rifle, originally used by Navy SEALs, is a Remington 700 long action in a lightweight, skeletonized chassis. The Mark 13 uses the Nightforce ATACR rifle scope with Horus Tremor3 reticle. The reticle features marks for quickly estimating range to target, compensating for bullet drop and accounting for wind shift.

The Marines plan to purchase 346 Mark 13 Mod 7 rifles for $4.3 million. The rifles are built by Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane division, in Crane, Indiana. NSWC Crane is responsible for several Navy and Marine Corps small arms projects, including the Mark 12 Special Purpose Rifle.